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ISTA Alumna Janina Kowalski smiling in front of a staircase

WHERE?

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL BASEL, SWITZERLAND

AREA OF WORK

AT ISTA

Janina Kowalski was a Postdoc in the Jonas group. She now works as a neuroscientist, psychiatrist, general practitioner, and trauma-therapist in Basel, Switzerland. In April 2022 she visited the ISTA campus to take a walk down memory lane and answer some questions about her work and career.

WHAT’S THE ESSENCE OF YOUR JOB?

Well, I’m taking care of people, enabling them, helping them find themselves, to find a better way of living their lives, even if they have had serious troubles in the past.

WHAT’S YOUR SCIENTIFIC BACKGROUND?

Well I started off as an MD. Then I did a PhD in neuroscience and I was basically working on patch-clamp recordings in the brain. First, in Freiburg im Breisgau and then I moved with my postdoc lab to the ISTA.

WHERE DO YOU SEE YOURSELF IN THE FUTURE?

I see myself in the future indeed continuing that work but going even more into experimental approaches and into research mostly focusing on trauma therapy.

WHAT ROLE DID ISTA PLAY IN YOUR CAREER?

Well I could dive deeper into basic science techniques and the thing I cherished the most here was the connection between different groups from different fields. Not only from neuroscience. That was very inspiring for me.

WHAT ARE YOUR FAVORITE MEMORIES OF ISTA?

Well, the nights on the bridge during late focused research times. Chatting to other people from other labs. These were quite amazing.

CAN YOU GIVE THREE PIECES OF ADVICE TO CURRENT ISTA MEMBERS?

Follow your ideals and your heart and your brain. Don’t pick only one. And talk about yourself, talk about troubles, look for other people, who might want to listen. And: Don’t let yourself get distracted by what the global opinion is. Do your thing. Stay true to yourself.

Anton Mellit receiving the 1st ISTA Alumni award
© ISTA

For the first time, ISTA presented an outstanding achievement award to an alumnus. The ISTA Alumni Award went to former ISTA postdoc Anton Mellit, an outstanding mathematician who, according to his former group leader Prof. Tamas Hausel, “works in four to five different areas of mathematics simultaneously and achieves extraordinary success.” The Ukrainian is currently an associate professor at the University of Vienna and has gained international attention for his work on knot theory, algebraic combinatorics, algebraic geometry, and number theory.

Harald Ringbauer IST Austria Alumni

WHERE?

MAX PLANCK INSTITUTE FOR EVOLUTIONARY ANTHROPOLOGY, LEIPZIG, GERMANY

AREA OF WORK

AT IST AUSTRIA

Harald Ringbauer was a PhD student in the Nick Barton group. He is now a group leader at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig. In January 2021 he visited the IST Austria campus to take a walk down memory lane and answer some questions about his work and career.

WHAT’S WRITTEN ON YOUR BUSINESS CARD?

My business card right now says group leader at the Max Planck Institute for archaeogenetics in Leipzig, and I actually adjusted to get a new business card. Because up until now, I was doing a postdoc at Harvard, at the Harvard Medical School. I will actually keep my affiliation. So it will be a pretty cool business card.

WHAT’S THE ESSENCE OF YOUR JOB?

I’m an archaeogeneticist, which means that we get DNA from human remains who lived 1000s of years ago. And then, we look at how people moved around, how they’re related, and their social structure. So we try to get insight into past movement into past mobility into past patterns, how we live together. The coolest thing is that you really get fascinating insights of people who lived like 1000s of years ago, and it’s still mind-boggling for me. For instance, Ötzi: We have his whole genome, and you can really see to whom he is related and how he came there. We can see from which group he was if his parents were related. So, the coolest thing about my job is that you really get fascinating new insights into who these past people were.

The limitations are that, when we look at the human past, this is often a very emotionally very loaded topic. So often, even when you don’t even think about it. When we only tell stories about past movements or stories about ancestry. People with certain agendas try to take these results and make an argument out of them. So you always have to be careful not to step on anyone’s toes, and also to present it in a very sensible way.

WHERE DO YOU SEE YOURSELF IN THE FUTURE?

Totally in science. So normal will be for five years at the Max Planck Institute as a group leader. I hope to see myself in five years in Leipzig. And then beyond that: a career in science. Actually, long run, I like humans. They are very interesting for doing ancient DNA. But now we can also do ancient DNA on animals and dogs, on horses, and so on. So that would actually go full circle for the PhD doing genetic analysis, and I want to stay in that kind of topic.

WHAT’S YOUR SCIENTIFIC BACKGROUND?

In my bachelor’s and master’s, I did mathematics and physics at the University of Vienna, so actually very abstract. And then only at the IST, I came, I became more interested in actually population genetics, where you can actually apply these mathematical tools to population genetics, and then became more and more interested in actual data analysis. And so, in the US, I really dove deep into archaeogenetics. That’s actually a very interesting story. Because before I started, I was actually thinking: history or mathematics. Because actually, I had a big interest in human history. But I chose mathematics. And I would not have guessed that, actually, by choosing to study mathematics, I would end up with an academic position in archaeology and human history. And it’s really funny to see like this way of quantitative thinking and like this modeling is now actually very useful in really like figuring out, really old big archaeological questions about the human prehistory and also now about human history.

WHAT ROLE DID IST AUSTRIA PLAY IN YOUR CAREER?

It was the first time I came into contact with world-class population genetics. I was really lucky to have my supervisor Nick Barton, who is like a world-renowned expert, and I really came into contact with bleeding-edge science, like meeting the experts in the field. I got really good training in that and a lot of expertise. Up until now, I think this is the skill set and the network. I think that it is absolutely the key to my career.

GIVE THREE PIECES OF ADVICE TO CURRENT IST AUSTRIA MEMBERS

The first piece of advice is: Don’t listen to advice. Go your own way. It’s like sciences. There are many aspects. It’s different for anyone, like it’s different per field it is different per character. There are actually many paths to success, and everyone has to find their own way, tailored to their own strength.

But then the second one, you should actually listen to that one: hard work and patience. It’s often not easy in science. You have to keep going. Everyone has good and bad days. It’s totally normal to have bad days, but persistence is important.

The third one is: don’t forget to have fun. You have to find a good balance. It was really good to play table soccer and getting everything out of the system.  Most of us are not robots, and most of us, you know, work best when we have a good balance.

WHAT ARE YOUR FAVORITE MEMORIES OF IST AUSTRIA?

Great moments were certainly coming to the bridge after lunch and seeing everyone, my cohort, my international group of friends, having fun on the bridge having fun talking. So many fun moments: Playing table soccer, going to the sauna! All our retreats! Just sitting outside on the balcony. Coming back here to IST, it’s actually all coming back to me. Actually, I am thinking of doing another PhD at IST. 😉

WHERE?

GENENTECH, USA

AREA OF WORK

AT IST AUSTRIA

Christine Moussion was a Postdoc at  IST Austria. She now works  as a group leader for Genentech in Califonia. At IST Austria Christine Moussion was in Michael Sixt’s group.

In an interview with Daniela Klammer and Kathrin Pauser which took place during the Science and Industry Day 2018 she answered some interesting questions about her work and how her career developed.

WHAT’S WRITTEN ON YOUR BUSINESS CARD?

On my business card is my first name and my last name, my position: I am a scientist in cancer immunology at Genentech in San Francisco, my address and my phone number. 😉

WHAT’S THE COOLEST THING ABOUT YOUR JOB?

I lead a research team in a big pharma company I work in basic science and in the same time I lead 3 to 4 people in the basic science and at the same time I do some drug discovery at the same time. I think the coolest thing about my job is it is all about science. Basic science or applied science so to develop new treatment and also that there is no limitation. So we can do whatever we want in term of support facilities money so I think it is really to have great science and great support.

WHERE DO YOU SEE YOURSELF IN THE FUTURE?

In the future I think I will go where the science will bring me. All I have worked for now is where I am happy to work on and I hope I can contribute to the development of new treatment for disease and at the same time make great basic science discoveries. And have fun in science.

WHAT’S YOUR ACADEMIC BACKGROUND?

I trained as a bioengineer in biotechnology and I worked for a short time in a start up in drug development. Then I came back to university because I decided to step back and to learn a new field which was immunology which I got very passionate about. So I did a PhD in immunology and a postdoc at IST Austria in Michael Sixt’s lab. I worked at the migration of leucocytes and developed a new bio imaging technic and assets that I can now apply in my current job. So I looked at immune cells recruitment in tumor and how to stimulate the recruitment of this leucocytes to improve cancer immune therapy.

WHAT ROLE DID IST AUSTRIA PLAY IN YOUR CAREER?

IST Austria gave me the freedom to explore science the edges of science of my field like working at the interfaces between immunology and bio imaging for example. The platform of bioimaging is amazing and is always stimulating the progress, the development of new techniques. My mentor played the biggest role. He gave me freedom and he gave me support in terms of looking for jobs by connecting with his network and confidence.

IST was my first international experience. So I learned English here because I came from France. So now that I am living in the US the Americans say that I am speaking with a German accent. I am not sure about that I think I still have a strong French accent. Here I connected with a different type of culture and a different kind of science, really multidisciplinary, so I connected with Mathematicians or physicists and that’s what I liked at IST.

GIVE THREE PIECES OF ADVICE TO CURRENT IST AUSTRIA MEMBERS

If I rely on my experience I would say: follow the science. See where the science will bring you. But take action you are the actor of your career. You have to make decisions if you need to step back if you need to change direction. You have to keep being proactive. Work hard surely for papers. Papers can get you everywhere. Go to conferences, connect to the leaders in your field to see where your field is moving and it’s also easier if you want to work in industry if you already know people working there. So if people know you and they know your way of thinking and the science you want to develop it is easier to get in later on. Chose a good mentor, a supportive mentor is crucial for a great future job.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE MEMORY OF IST AUSTRIA?

I have two probably. When I was living in the guest house and also later I was able to cook French recipes and I was able to share French food with my colleges and I could learn recipes from different cuisine like Indian and I loved that a lot. And I also loved the postdoc retreat when we were going to the mountain for skiing. I think that were the two moments where I connected and I made really good friends, really strong connections. So that is probably my favorite moment at IST.

WHERE?

MAX PLANCK INSTITUTE FOR INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS, TÜBINGEN, GERMANY

AREA OF WORK

AT IST AUSTRIA

Michal Rolinek was a PhD student at IST Austria. He now works as a postdoc at the Max Plank Institute for Intelligent Systems. At IST Austria Michal Rolinek was in the Kolmogorv Group.

He returned to campus as a speaker at the Science Industry Day 2018 and found the time to give an interview and answer some interesting questions about his work.

WHAT’S WRITTEN ON YOUR BUSINESS CARD?

I don’t have a business card but if I had one it would say that I am a postdoc at the Max Plank Institute for intelligent systems.

WHAT’S THE COOLEST THING ABOUT YOUR JOB?

In our group, we are trying to connect new methods for artificial intelligence and to connect it with the world of robotics. And the coolest thing is that we have a whole floor of robots.

WHERE DO YOU SEE YOURSELF IN THE FUTURE?

I don’t have a particular plan right now. Luckily we live in the days where there are amazing opportunities for computer scientists so I will just wait and see where they take me.

WHAT’S YOUR ACADEMIC BACKGROUND?

I got my master’s degree in Prague in mathematical analysis and here at IST, I got my PhD in theoretical computer science.

WHAT ROLE DID IST AUSTRIA PLAY IN YOUR CAREER?

IST played a massive role for my career. I am really happy to say that the opportunities that I have right now are nothing I was imagining three or five years ago and if you told me I would not have believed it.

GIVE THREE PIECES OF ADVICE TO CURRENT IST AUSTRIA MEMBERS

One, learn as much as you can about as much as you can. I think that IST is a great place for learning no matter which position you are holding here.

Two, be compassionate the academic environment can be very pressurizing and stressful and the sources of stress can be often different for different people so it is hard to relate. Care for the wellbeing of your coworkers and they will do the same for you.

Three, do it for the joy. I think that joy is the best motivation to do science or to do anything really.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE MEMORY OF IST AUSTRIA?

I have had so many great memories. I had a great time in our office and playing football great time at retreats. But if I were to pick one it was the few boxing matches I had in the lecture hall.

WHERE?

AREA OF WORK

MY RESEARCH LIES AT THE INTERFACE OF COMPUTER AND BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES AND FOCUSES ON THE STOCHASTIC PROCESSES UNDERLYING EVOLUTION. I DEVELOP COMPUTATIONAL METHODS TO LEARN FROM LARGE-SCALE BIOLOGICAL DATA SETS AND BUILD MATHEMATICAL MODELS TO EXPLAIN OBSERVATIONS ON A MECHANISTIC FASHION.

MOST RECENTLY, I FOCUSED ON INFERRING THE EVOLUTION AND THE SEEDING OF METASTASES IN PANCREATIC CANCERS.

AT IST AUSTRIA

Johannes Reiter returned to campus in Fall 2018 to give a special Think and Drink and to share his research with the current campus community. He also found time to do a video interview with us.

WHAT’S WRITTEN ON YOUR BUSINESS CARD?

I don’t really have a business card but if I had one it would say Johannes Reiter instructor at the Canary Center for Cancer Early Detection at Stanford University School of Medicine.

WHAT’S THE COOLEST THING ABOUT YOUR JOB?

The coolest thing is that I can work on a globally really important disease. I work on tumors and specifically tumor evolution. I try to approach this problem from a mathematical perspective I try to come up with a quantitative framework that can describe the evolution of cancer.

WHERE DO YOU SEE YOURSELF IN THE FUTURE?

In the future, I still want to be at the interface of multiple fields like computer science, biology and medicine. I also want to do research in academia perhaps also together at a medical school or a hospital and work together with various researchers from these various disciplines.

WHAT’S YOUR ACADEMIC BACKGROUND?

My background is in computer science, originally I actually did computer engineering. Then I did computer science at the Technical University in Vienna. When I came to IST I wanted to stay in computer science but I kind of got into theoretical biology and towards the end, I got more into cancer evolution and combining data analysis and mathematical modeling.

WHAT ROLE DID IST AUSTRIA PLAY IN YOUR CAREER?

IST played a really important role in my career because before I started here I saw myself as an engineer and not as much as a scientist. But then when I started my PhD here I got introduced into so many different areas and I got interested in areas outside of computer science and outside of computer engineering. And that is also the most interesting thing about my job currently. That I can work with experts from various different fields and that keeps my job interesting.

GIVE THREE PIECES OF ADVICE TO CURRENT IST AUSTRIA MEMBERS

My advice would be: think critically and deeply, try to become independent and ask your own questions, very early on in your career. And perhaps do an internship in industry so you have a good comparison between research that is happening in academia and research that is happening outside of academia.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE MEMORY OF IST AUSTRIA?

My favorite memory of IST are definitely all the table soccer games which we played for a lot of time basically every day after lunch.

WHERE?

AREA OF WORK

AT IST AUSTRIA

Inma Sanchez Romero was a Postdoc at IST Austria. She now works for the research Services of the University of Vienna, as an Assistant Project Manager of the INDICAR (Inter Disciplinary Cancer Research) Postdoctoral Fellowship Programme of the University of Vienna and the Technology Transfer Office. At IST Austria Inma Sanchez Romero was in Harald Janovjak’s group.

In an interview with Daniela Klammer and Kathrin Pauser which took place during the Science and Industry Day 2017 she answered some interesting questions about her work and her decision to switch from a scientific career to supporting science in a different way.

WHAT’S WRITTEN ON YOUR BUSINESS CARD?

I work in research project management at the University of Vienna. Specifically, I work for a postdoctoral fellowship program called INDICAR (INterDIsciplinary CAncer Research), which is co-funded by the EU Framework Programme 7 (FP7) Marie Curie Actions.

So, on my business card it’s written my name, Ing. Inmaculada Sanchez Romero, PhD, and my position, INDICAR Assistant project manager.

WHAT’S THE ESSENCE OF YOUR JOB?

My job is to support the INDICAR program and its fellows by looking for funding opportunities, writing and submitting proposals, and organizing outreach activities to disseminate information about our program and our fellows’ research. For example, I organize workshops to develop and strengthen our fellows’ skills.

WHAT DO YOU REALLY LIKE ABOUT YOUR JOB?

There are two things that I really like about my job. One of them is organizing workshops and scientific events. And the second is that I like to think that I can have a positive impact on our fellows’ careers by looking for funding opportunities for them or by contributing to their professional development, by organizing workshops and outreach activities.

WHAT ARE THE CHALLENGES?

I think there are only a few positions in research project management. Once the transition is made, your professional profile becomes very specific. That might be a problem when looking for a position in another country or at another company.

WHERE DO YOU SEE YOURSELF IN THE FUTURE?

I see myself working in research project management in an academic environment managing a research program and supporting its fellows.

WHAT IS YOUR ACADEMIC BACKGROUND?

I studied chemical engineering at the University of Granada in Spain, where I also did my masters in biotechnology. Then I obtained my PHD in chemistry working on protein engineering at the University of Granada in collaboration with Columbia University in New York, where I had three short-term research visits, and the Danish biotech company Novozymes Then later I did my postdoc at IST Austria working in synthetic biology in the Janovjak lab.

WHAT ROLE DID IST PLAY FOR YOUR CAREER?

Besides all the support in scientific research at IST, I had the opportunity to collaborate and plan and organize scientific events. As a result, I explored and developed my organizational and management skills. That made me realize that I wanted to focus my career in that direction.

GIVE 3 PIECES OF ADVICE TO CURRENT IST MEMBERS

Work on your career development to obtain a good-sized set of transferable skills, not only by participating in workshops, but also by getting experience through volunteering, for example by organizing scientific events. Here at IST Austria there are a lot of opportunities for that.

The second one is to network, to attend conferences and workshops, to talk to people and create a solid network of contacts.

The third one is for people who are considering leaving academia. I would like them to know that they shouldn’t be afraid of the unknown. That leaving academia doesn’t mean that they have failed. It just means that they have other interests. It takes a lot of courage to follow your dreams and leave your comfort zone and to be willing to explore other possibilities.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE MEMORY OF IST AUSTRIA?

One of my favorite moments at IST Austria was at the Young Scientists’ Symposium. I was part of the organizing committee. After all the work and all the effort organizing, it was amazing to see that it was something real. That it was happening and everything was working perfectly. The speakers and the attendees were really satisfied with the event. It was a rewarding moment and an amazing experience.

WHERE?

AREA OF WORK

AT IST AUSTRIA

Harold De Vladar was at IST Austria from 2009 to 2013 as a postdoc in the Barton Group. He is now CEO and founder of Ribbon Biolabs GmbH. In an interview with Daniela Klammer and Kathrin Pauser which took place during the Science and Industry Day 2017 he talks about what he likes about his research but also about his career and about his time at IST Austria when IST Austria was still very small.

WHAT’S WRITTEN ON YOUR BUSINESS CARD?

Harold de Vladar, my position: CEO and the name of my startup which is Ribbon Biolabs GmbH.

WHAT’S THE ESSENCE OF YOUR JOB?

The essence of my job is to develop the technology to secure the IP of the technology and also to consolidate and make sure that the team is on a good track to develop the technology.

WHAT ARE THE LIMITATIONS OF THE JOB AND WHAT’S THE COOLEST THING ABOUT THE JOB?

The limitations is that once you start with your own startup you have less freedom to do other things and when you come from an academic background you are probably excited about so many things and then you find yourself restricted doing stuff that you didn’t want to do in the first place like financial sheets or business plans. Which you have to do but what you want to do is just do experiments and equations’ stuff. The cool thing is that you are working for something that is entirely yours.  It’s not like working for an institute for two years and after the two years that’s it. It is money you get and you construct your own stuff so it is yours.  You develop it as you want you do exactly what you want it is your decision what you are doing and that rocks.

WHERE DO YOU SEE YOURSELF IN THE FUTURE?

I want to develop this company obviously and I want to be in a position where I am developing new ideas new products or solving new problems related to science. So tech transfer if you wish but real problems and I want to do things that are a bit non canonical, not the standard things. I know it sounds a bit abstract but biology is very vast. There are many interesting things there that you can actually take and make a product out of it for a specific purpose. This is the things I like to make. I would also like to keep a bit of research going like basic research or more explorative research in order to allow the serendipity factor to come to new possibilities.

WHAT IS YOUR ACADEMIC BACKGROUND?

It’s a complex one. I started as a cell biologist and statistical physics at the same time. Then went into applied math’s only to get more formal tools to work with my stuff related to genetics and evolution. Then I did my PhD in evolutionary ecology, actually I did my PhD in evolution in a group of evolutionary ecology which is what let me to Nick Barton and that is how I ended up at IST Austria. And I also have a degree in art and science which sounds very disconnected to all this but it is not.

WHAT ROLE DID IST PLAY FOR YOUR CAREER?

First of all the connectivity how I connected to the people here which are now in different places either because they were postdocs or because they were exprofessors from here in some other places this allowed a lot of connections directly or indirectly. That was something very important.

And what was also crucial. Having worked with someone like Nick Barton this was an amazing endorsement. We did great job Nick and I, what we did was awesome. It was not on the side of being extra productive but more on the side of taking very challenging problems and solving them. So it was not like salami slicing papers and that created a very idiosyncratic way of seeing science for me because I always gave more importance to this aspect than to publish many papers something that many universities don’t like.

So IST Austria determined my career in these two ways in the way I see it but also which options do I have but not by restricting them but by me realizing what is it what I want to do. I always felt more comfortable in Institutes of advanced studies small places where you can think of new things rather than the big shot universities where people go mad with the latest nature cover and you have to race with them. That’s not my style.

GIVE 3 PIECES OF ADVICE TO CURRENT IST MEMBERS

For the postdocs of IST Austria: Things have probably changed a lot since I left IST Austria but I think there are two levels of things that you have to learn as a postdoc. First of all you have to do your work project as it means of learning maturing etc. but you also have to keep a close eye on what you want and what are the next career steps. You can get very distracted with your project and forget that there is a future that you have to fulfill. And I saw many postdocs forgetting these things.

Second, I feel like there is a lot of gab between what is a postdoc and what is a professor and IST doesn’t give this feeling of continuity between one and the other.  I think at least in my time it was great to be here as a first postdoc but not as a second because you won’t have that much independence you won’t  have that much support beyond your project.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE MEMORY OF IST AUSTRIA?

I think it was one of these barbeques and we went into the pond, swimming in the pond. I don’t think Tom Henzinger was so happy with us the next day. This was when IST was relatively small. We could have staff meetings of the whole institute every week and these meetings didn’t get to more than 20 people. None of the building existed. That was very fun.

WHAT DETERMINED YOUR POST IST CAREER MOVE?

Very simple what kind of problems do I really want to solve and how.

WHERE?

AREA OF WORK

AT IST AUSTRIA

Stefan Huber was at IST Austria from 2013 to 2015 as a postdoc in the Edelsbrunner Group. He is now a researcher at Bernecker + Rainer in industrial R&D. In his interview, he talks about his research but also about his career and about his time at IST Austria.

WHAT’S WRITTEN ON YOUR BUSINESS CARD?

Stefan Huber, Research and Development

WHAT’S THE ESSENCE OF YOUR JOB?

I designed the software concept that means the algorithms, the mathematical models for the next generation industrial transport system of B&R which is called  ACOBOStrak.

WHAT ARE THE LIMITATIONS OF YOUR JOB AND WHAT ARE THE UPSIDES, THE COOL THINGS?

The coolest thing I think is: It is a very interdisciplinary project. There are bright people from control theory, from mathematics, computer science and together we shape a new kind of technology that could actually change the way industrial machines are built in the future.

WHERE DO YOU SEE YOURSELF IN THE FUTURE?

I believe that the current R&D project I am working on kind of demonstrates how computer science has a deep impact on industrial automatization. I think this is only a start so in the future I would like to shape a stronger group in the company that focuses on computer science algorithms and mathematics.

WHAT IS YOUR ACADEMIC BACKGROUND?

My academic background is actually algorithms more precisely it is computational geometry and topology so I have a double degree in computer science and mathematics. I studied in Salzburg I did my PhD in computational geometry and then for a short time I was a senior scientist at the math department. After that I joined Herbert Edelsbrunner’s group at IST Austria for two years in computational topology.

WHAT ROLE DID IST PLAY FOR YOUR CAREER?

To me IST Austria was intellectually very inspiring. So looking back at IST I see that the experiences that I gained at IST gave me a lot of confidence and trust in scientific principles and that again has an influence in my work because I know that I can trust on scientific methodologies to solve the problems I face in my industry job.

GIVE 3 PIECES OF ADVICE TO CURRENT IST MEMBERS

First actively participate in intellectual exchanges.

Try to go to as many workshops and conferences as you can do.

And third use the freedom and opportunities you get from IST Austria. In my case I wasn’t forced to pursue a particular direction in my research. So that’s a nice thing you are completely open. They are very generous when it comes to visiting conferences and there are a lot of scientific visitors to get in touch and to have discussions after a talk when drinking a glass of wine or going to Heurigen.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE MEMORY OF IST AUSTRIA?

What I really loved was when there were big visitors like Steve Smale and we went to Heurigen for dinner in the evening and the kind of talks that developed at an evening event are quite different and I enjoyed that very much.

WHERE?

AREA OF WORK

AT IST AUSTRIA

Vicent Botella-Soler was a Postdoc at  IST Austria. He now works for ForwardKeys in Spain. ForwardKeys analyses global travel movements to help companies improve their tactical decision making. At IST Austria Vicent Botella-Soler was a Postdoc in Gašper Tkačik’s group.

In an interview with Daniela Klammer and Kathrin Pauser which took place during the Science and Industry Day 2017 he answered some interesting questions about his work.

WHAT’S WRITTEN ON YOUR BUSINESS CARD?

Vicent Botella-Soler, Innovation and Machine Learning Manager at ForwardKeys

WHAT’S THE ESSENCE OF YOUR JOB?

At ForwardKeys we analyze large datasets from the travel industry to provide forecasts and insights to our clients. We maintain a daily-updated database of all the flight bookings worldwide. The analysis of this large amount of data allows us to answer interesting questions in industry sectors such as retail, hospitality, tourism management or financial services.

WHAT ARE THE LIMITATIONS OF YOUR JOB AND WHAT ARE THE UPSIDES, THE COOL THINGS?

It is very nice to have a sort of magnifying glass above the planet and watch, almost in real-time, how people move around and how different events and contexts affect the flow.

Limitations are all the typical limitations intrinsic to working with data…there are plenty of them, but these are the daily challenges you’ve got to get used to.

WHERE DO YOU SEE YOURSELF IN THE FUTURE?

I see myself working on this kind of quantitative, analytic, data-driven problems. Also, I’ll make sure that I keep learning new skills and new techniques—that is what I find most exciting.

WHAT IS YOUR ACADEMIC BACKGROUND?

I studied theoretical physics and did a master in astrophysics. For my PhD I moved to dynamical systems and neuroscience. Here at IST Austria I worked in computational science, applying machine learning techniques to the problem of decoding visual stimuli from the spiking response of the retinal neurons.

WHAT ROLE DID IST AUSTRIA PLAY FOR YOUR CAREER?

Both through my work and by meeting and being in touch with very good scientists, I think I gained the skills and the confidence to be where I am now.

GIVE 3 PIECES OF ADVICE TO CURRENT IST MEMBERS

First and foremost, don’t put all your eggs in one basket. Make sure you give yourself plenty of possibilities and allow enough flexibility when you confront your future.

Always look around, talk to people in different fields and in industry, and also in different career paths. This way you can get a good idea of the context in which your career moves.

Also, it is very important that you trust your skills. Trust that the knowledge and habits that you have gained in science are valuable beyond the walls of academia.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE MEMORY OF IST AUSTRIA?

When I came to IST it was still fairly small. It was very nice to go around campus during the first weeks and find that everybody just introduced themselves to you. It was easy to identify the newcomers and make them feel welcome.

And of course I met my wife here and my two kids where born while I was working at IST, so I keep many fond memories attached to the Institute.

WHAT WAS A MAJOR FACTOR IN DETERMINING YOUR POST-IST CAREER MOVE?

It was mostly a family choice. We wanted to have a say in where we lived. So we chose where we wanted to live, and then our careers had to adapt to our decision.