Shigemoto Group

Molecular Neuroscience

Information transmission, the formation of memory, and plasticity are all controlled by various molecules at work in the brain. Focusing on the localization and distribution of molecules in brain cells, the Shigemoto group investigates their functional roles in higher brain functions.

The release of neurotransmitters from a nerve cell into the synapse, where they act on receptors on the connecting nerve cell, is the primary process of information transmission and computation in the brain. The Shigemoto group studies the localization of single neurotransmitter receptors, ion channels, and other functional molecules to understand the molecular basis of neuronal information processing. The group has pioneered several methods for studying the localization of functional molecules at an unprecedented sensitivity, detecting and visualizing even single membrane proteins in nerve cells using SDS-digested freeze-fracture replica labeling. They apply these methods to investigate the mechanisms of signaling and plasticity in the brain, with questions ranging from neurotransmission to learning.


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Team

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Catarina Alcarva

PhD Student

+43 2243 9000 2090

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Pradeep Bhandari

Postdoc

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Jessica Coelho Gaspar

Postdoc


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Kohgaku Eguchi

Postdoc

+43 2243 90007631 0

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Elena Hollergschwandtner

Laboratory Technician

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Muhammad Jahirul Islam

Postdoc


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Marijo Jevtic

PhD Student

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David Kleindienst

Postdoc

+43 2243 9000 7630

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Peter Koppensteiner

Postdoc


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Hana Korinkova

PhD Student

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Elodie Le Monnier

Laboratory Technician

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Jacqueline-Claire Montanaro-Punzengruber

Senior Laboratory Technician


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Maria Silva Sifuentes

Laboratory Technician

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Cihan Önal

PhD Student


Current Projects

New chemical labeling methods for high resolution EM visualization of single molecules | Ultrastructural localization and function of receptors and ion channels in the brain | Mechanisms of long-term memory formation | Left-right asymmetry of hippocampal circuitry


Publications

Kaufmann W, Kleindienst D, Harada H, Shigemoto R. 2021.High-Resolution localization and quantitation of membrane proteins by SDS-digested freeze-fracture replica labeling (SDS-FRL). In: Receptor and Ion Channel Detection in the Brain. Neuromethods, vol. 169, 267–283. View

Fredes F, Shigemoto R. 2021. The role of hippocampal mossy cells in novelty detection. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory. 183, 107486. View

Kleindienst D. 2021. 2B or not 2B: Hippocampal asymmetries mediated by NMDA receptor subunit GluN2B C-terminus and high-throughput image analysis by Deep-Learning. IST Austria. View

Bhandari P, Vandael DH, Fernández-Fernández D, Fritzius T, Kleindienst D, Önal HC, Montanaro-Punzengruber J-C, Gassmann M, Jonas PM, Kulik A, Bettler B, Shigemoto R, Koppensteiner P. 2021. GABAB receptor auxiliary subunits modulate Cav2.3-mediated release from medial habenula terminals. eLife. 10, e68274. View

Schöpf CL, Ablinger C, Geisler SM, Stanika RI, Campiglio M, Kaufmann W, Nimmervoll B, Schlick B, Brockhaus J, Missler M, Shigemoto R, Obermair GJ. 2021. Presynaptic α2δ subunits are key organizers of glutamatergic synapses. PNAS. 118(14). View

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Career

since 2013 Professor, IST Austria
1998 – 2014 Professor, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki, Japan
1990 – 1998 Assistant Professor, Kyoto University Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan
1994 PhD, Kyoto University, Japan
1985 MD, Kyoto University Faculty of Medicine, Japan


Selected Distinctions

ISI Highly Cited Researcher
2017 Member, Academia Europaea
2016 ERC Advanced Grant
2000 ISI Citation Laureate Award


Additional Information

Download CV

ERC Advanced Grant website



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